Are They Dupes?: Drunk Elephant Protini Polypeptide Cream Vs Acure Radically Rejuvenating Whipped Night Cream

by Gio
an affordable dupe for drunk elephant protini polypeptide cream

Stop the press! I’ve finally found a dupe for Drunk Elephant Protini Polypeptide Cream – and it’s less than half the price!

The catch? Acure Radically Rejuvenating Whipped Night Cream is NOT suitable for everyone. Some skin types will like it more than others. Are you one of the lucky few? Read on:


Peptides

Both Drunk Elephant Protini Polypeptide Cream and Acure Radically Rejuvenating Whipped Night Cream contain the same peptides (A LOT of them):

I’m sceptical of peptides. Most of these studies were done in vitro (NOT on real skin) by the manufacturers. Not the most unbiased source!

Having said that, there’s enough independent evidence that copper peptides can keep skin in a constant state of repair and help firm skin. If you want to give those a try, both creams are worth a go.

FYI, Growth Factors do not cause cancer. But like everything else in your body, they can feed it. Dr. John and Dr. George, authors of barefacedtruth.com say it best:

We do not believe that EGF causes cancer. Period. There is much research about how cancers use EGF and other growth factors and their receptors to further their agenda of growth at all costs. But the same can be said of the ability of cancers to beg, borrow, or steal blood, oxygen, nutrients, and everything else they need for growth, often at the dire expense of tissues, organs or the whole organism. In short – that is the very nature of cancer and why it is dangerous – but that is not the nature of EGF. To blame EGF would be like blaming amino acids, carbs, fats, vitamins, minerals, hormones, etc. (cancers use them all). But you should think of EGF as the stolen object, not the thief. To the extent that cancers may co opt EGF, well then so does healing tissue after a surgery, or skin after damage by the sun.  There is no scientific evidence that EGF applied to skin in any dose causes cancer.  But then you don’t want to apply it to known skin cancers either. That is common sense. Knowing your own skin, and the signs of skin cancer, and promptly presenting to your doctor if you perceive any changes is the reasonable caution there.

Related: Do Copper Peptides Work Better Than Retinoids?

Moisturising Base

Drunk Elephant Protini Polypeptide Cream and Acure Radically Rejuvenating Whipped Night Cream don’t just use the same peptides. 99% of the moisturising ingredients that make up the bulk of the cream are the same too:

Related: What The Heck Are Humectants And Why Are They In My Skincare Products?

Amino Acids Vs Antioxidants

So far, I’ve focused on what Drunk Elephant Protini Polypeptide Cream and Acure Radically Rejuvenating Whipped Night Cream have in common. They’re almost perfect dupes.

I say almost because Drunk Elephant chose to go with amino acids, while Acure is loaded with antioxidants. Let’s start with them.

Acure Radically Rejuvenating Whipped Night Cream has vitamin C, ferulic acid and turmeric, all antioxidants proven to fight the free radicals that give you wrinkles and dark spots. Granted, there’s only a sprinkle of them here but hey, every little bit helps.

Drunk Elephant Protini Polypeptide Cream has every amino acids you can think of. Amino acids do all kinds of things for your skin, from fighting free radicals (histidine), to boosting collagen (proline) and helping skin heal faster (arginine).

Which one is better for anti-aging? Hard to say. It’s like comparing apples to oranges. A better approach is, what is your skincare missing?

If it’s low on amino acids, go with Drunk Elephant. If you could do with more antioxidants, Acure is the better choice.

Related: The Complete Guide To Amino Acids: What They Are, What They Do For Skin And Where To Find Them

SHOP THE POST

What Else Do You Need To Know?

The other main difference between Drunk Elephant Protini Polypeptide Cream and Acure Radically Rejuvenating Whipped Night Cream is their texture.

Drunk Elephant has a lightweight gel texture that sinks in quickly without leaving a greasy residue behind. It’s suitable for all skin types, including oily and acne-prone.

Acure has a much heavier cream texture. It takes a while to sink in and can feel heavy on some skin types. I’d recommend it only to dry skin.

Which Of The Two Should You Go For?

If you’re looking for a peptide cream, both Drunk Elephant Protini Polypeptide Cream and Acure Radically Rejuvenating Whipped Night Cream will do. But which one is better for YOU? It depends on your skin type and needs:

Go with Drunk Elephant Protini Polypeptide Cream if:

  • You have combination, oily, acne-prone skin
  • You need more amino acids in your skincare routine
  • You prefer gel textures

Choose Acure Radically Rejuvenating Whipped Night Cream if:

  • You have dry skin
  • You need more antioxidants in your skincare routine
  • You prefer cream textures
  • You’re on a budget and willing to compromise on texture

Availability

Drunk Elephant Protini Polypeptide Cream ($68.00): available at Cult Beauty, Sephora and SpaceNK

Acure Radically Rejuvenating Whipped Night Cream ($19.99): available at Acure, iHerb and Target

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Is Acure Radically Rejuvenating Whipped Night Cream A Dupe For Drunk Elephant Protini Polypeptide Cream?

Acure Radically Rejuvenating Whipped Night Cream isn’t an exact dupe for Drunk Elephant Protini Polypeptide Cream – but it’s close enough. If it’s a peptide cream you want, both will do the trick. But Acure is better for dry skin, while Drunk Elephant is suitable for all skin types.

Have you tried Acure Radically Rejuvenating Whipped Night Cream and Drunk Elephant Protini Polypeptide Cream? Share your pick in the comments below.

Drunk Elephant Protini Polypeptide Cream Ingredients: Water/Aqua/Eau, Dicaprylyl Carbonate, Glycerin, Cetearyl Alcohol, Cetearyl Olivate, Sorbitan Olivate, Sclerocarya Birrea Seed Oil, Bacillus/Soybean/ Folic Acid Ferment Extract, Nymphaea Alba Root Extract, sh-Oligopeptide-1, sh-Oligopeptide-2, sh-Polypeptide-1, sh-Polypeptide-9, sh-Polypeptide-11, Copper Palmitoyl Heptapeptide-14, Heptapeptide-15 Palmitate, Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-7, Palmitoyl Tripeptide-1, Alanine, Arginine, Glycine, Histidine, Isoleucine, Phenylalanine, Proline, Serine, Threonine, Valine, Acetyl Glutamine, Coconut Alkanes, Coco-Caprylate/Caprate, Sodium Hyaluronate, Aspartic Acid, Linoleic Acid, Linolenic Acid, Lecithin, Butylene Glycol, Polyvinyl Alcohol, Sodium Lactate, Sodium PCA, PCA, Sorbitan Isostearate, Carbomer, Polysorbate 20, Polysorbate 60, Lactic Acid/Glycolic Acid Copolymer, Hydroxyethyl Acrylate/Sodium Acryloyldimethyl Taurate Copolymer, Xanthan Gum, Isomalt, 1,2-Hexanediol, Caprylyl Glycol, Chlorphenesin, Phenoxyethanol, Tocopherol, Sodium Benzoate, Phenylpropanol, Glyceryl Caprylate, Symphytum Officinale Callus Culture Extract

Acure Radically Rejuvenating Whipped Night Cream Ingredients: Water/Aqua/Eau, Glycerin, Cetearyl Alcohol, Cetearyl Olivate, Sorbitan Olivate, Sclerocarya Birrea (Marula) Seed Oil, Nymphaea Alba Root Extract, sh-Oligopeptide-1, sh-Oligopeptide-2, sh-Polypeptide-1, sh-Polypeptide-9, sh-Polypeptide-11, Copper Palmitoyl Heptapeptide-14, Heptapeptide-15 Palmitate, Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-7, Palmitoyl Tripeptide-1 (Peptide Blend), Ferulic Acid, Ascorbic Glucoside, Coconut Alkanes, Pseudoalteromonas Ferment Extract (Glacial Glycoproteins), Salicylic Acid Coco-Caprylate/Caprate, Sodium Hyaluronate, Aspartic Acid, Linoleic Acid, Linolenic Acid, Lecithin, Sodium PCA, PCA, Sorbitan Isostearate, Lactic Acid/Glycolic Acid Copolymer, Curcuma Longa (Turmeric) Root Extract, Symphytum Officinale Callus Culture Extract

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8 comments

Jennifer May 8, 2019 - 3:34 pm

Great article, Gio! Question-I thought you wrote in a previous post that Vitamin C deactivated Copper (or something to that extent), and not to combine them. You mention the Acure has both. Can you please clarify? Thank you 😉

Reply
Gio June 4, 2019 - 9:08 pm

Jennifer, I keep seeing claims you can’t use them together but no one cites a source of study! From what I’ve unearthed so far, it can deactivate it, but not in the way it’s used in cosmetics. This reaction seems to take forever so it’s not really a concern.

It also seems to happen with L-Ascorbic Acid. I haven’t seen research on derivatives yet.

Reply
Jennifer May 8, 2019 - 4:37 pm

It also appears that the American version has completely different ingredients, with watermellon called out. Weird.
https://www.target.com/p/acure-radically-rejuvenating-whipped-night-cream-facial-moisturizers-1-7-fl-oz/-/A-75561981

Reply
Gio June 4, 2019 - 9:05 pm

Jennifer, weird indeed.

Reply
Ann May 9, 2019 - 1:33 am

I’ve heard peptides in skincare can increase hair growth (peach fuzz on the face). What are your thoughts on this? Is there a specific peptide that I should avoid if I don’t want to risk more fuzz?

Reply
Gio June 4, 2019 - 9:04 pm

Ann, copper peptides can do this, especially if you’re prone to them.

Reply
Angela May 22, 2019 - 3:14 pm

Great comparison – I’ve just gotten a sampler of the Protini cream and of course love the texture, but I’m dreading the price tag if I decide to repurchase. Love that there’s a more affordable, creamy option.

Angela at Blush & Pearls

Reply
Gio June 4, 2019 - 8:53 pm

Angela, you will love this then. It’s a great alternative.

Reply

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