Retinoids Side Effects: How To Counteract The Peeling

by Gio
how to counteract peeling from retinoids

Wanna jump on the retinoid bandwagon but are scared they’ll turn your skin into a flaky, peeling mess?

I hear ya. You’ve heard that retinoid are the gold standard for antiaging. They reduce wrinkles. Shrink pores. Fade away dark spots.

You want yourself some of that. But you’re not keen on the adjustment period. You’ve gotta go to work. Have a social life. How can you leave the house when your skin is flaking worse than dried paint?!

Surely, there must be a way to enjoy that retinoid face without putting up with the peeling?

Yes. But first, let’s get to know retinoids a little bit better and find out why they behave like that in the first place:

What The Heck Are Retinoids And Why Should You Use Them?

Retinoids are forms of Vitamin A. The most common are:

  • Hydroxypinacolone retinoate
  • Retinaldehyde
  • Retinol
  • Retinyl Palmitate
  • Retinyl Retinoate
  • Tretinoin (retinoic acid – prescription only)

Basically, if there’s a “retin” in there, it’s a form of vitamin A.

The catch? Almost of all them must be converted into retinoid acid to work. The conversion looks like this.

Retinyl palmitate > Retinol > Retinaldehyde > Retinoic acid

Usually, the further away a form of Vitamin A is from retinoic acid, the less effective BUT gentler it is.

Retinoids help your skin in many ways:

Awesome, right?

The price to pay? Retinization.

the ordinary retinol 1

What The Heck Is Retinization?

Retinization is a fancy way to call the inevitable adjustment period. Six weeks of red, flaky mess even the best makeup in the world can’t hide (it just makes it look worse!). *sighs*

It’s enough to make you want to throw in the towel and forget this retinoid business altogether. Big mistake. This mess is a sign your retinoid is working.

Here’s the deal: retinoids speed up cellular turnover, i.e. the skin’s natural exfoliating process. This is NOT the same as “proper” exfoliation done with acids or scrubs (these REMOVE dead cells either manually or by dissolving the “glue” that holds them together).

But the result is similar. Retinoids make your skin cells turn over at a faster rate so now you have more dead cells on the surface of your skin. Hence the peeling.

But do you really have to put up with it? Here’s how to counteract the peeling effects of retinoids:

How To Minimize The Peeling From Retinoids:

There are a few ways. I encourage you to use them all for best results, especially if you’re using a prescription retinoid:

1. Don’t Stop

This is where most women go wrong. They see their faces turn into a flaky mess and stop using retinoids until it’s completely back to normal. The next time they use it, the peeling starts again. Before you know it, retinoids become something they use only once in a while. Or worse, quit completely.

When you do this, your skin is reverting back into beginner mode. You didn’t give it enough time to get used to retinoids so now it acts like you’re using them for the first time. Every time.

Once you introduce a retinoid into your skincare routine, stick with it. It’s ok to cut back frequency (I will show you how soon) but don’t stop using it completely.

The only exception? If your skin is so sensitive that even after trying all the tips in this post, the peeling stubbornly persist after 6 weeks, give up. Retinoids just don’t agree with your skin.

2. Start Small

If you’re starting your retinoid journey with Retin A or another prescription retinoid, the peeling is a done deal. There’s a reason why they’re prescription after all. The side effects are much more severe.

Unless they were prescribed by your doctor for a specific condition, it’s better for your skin (and your self-esteem) to start with a low dose of an OTC retinoid, like retinol.

Even so, start with the smallest concentration you can find. Believe it or not, 1% is HUGE for retinol. This is the stuff the PROs use. It’s the closest thing to a prescription retinoid you can find.

0.01%-0.3% is more than enough for beginners. Really. Retinoids are so powerful, a tiny bit goes a long, long way.

If your skin’s sensitive, I recommend you start with gentler forms of retinoids, like retinyl palmitate and hydroxypinacolone retinoate. They’re not as effective as retinol but they’re so gentle, they’re unlikely to irritate your skin. (Seriously, if your skin can’t take this, retinoids are definitely NOT for you).

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Related: What Strength Of Retinol Do You Really Need?

3. Go Slow

Retinoids are not like other skincare products. You can’t use them every day and expect them to give you gorgeous skin. You have to work your way up there.

When you first start out, use retinoids only twice a week. As your skin gets used to them (you’ll know when this happen – your skin will look smooth and radiant instead than red and flaky), build up frequency gradually. 

Overtime, some of you may be able to use retinoids daily. Others may want to stick to 3/4 times a week. I personally use retinol only every other night (I alternate it with glycolic acid).

medik8 retinol 6 TR 01

4. Moisturiser, Moisturize, Moisturize

Don’t wait for your skin to peel before doing something about it. You know retinoids are gonna dry out your skin and peel it like a potato so be proactive and slather on that moisturiser before the problem starts.

Every night, straight after retinoids or at the end of your skincare routine (if you have a longer night-time routine), slather on that moisturiser.

If you find this alone isn’t enough, switch to a richer formula. Facial oils work well too.

P.S. If you have sensitive skin or are using a prescription retinoid, consider putting on your moisturiser before the retinoid product. Yes, this may prevent some of the retinoid to penetrate through your skin – but that’s what makes the retinoid gentler and less likely to make your skin peel.

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5. Let Retinoids Play Solo

Look, I get it. You want to use all the good antiaging stuff. Like vitamin C to fight wrinkles and glycolic acid to exfoliate skin. The more the merrier, right?

Not really. Thing is, all these ingredients are super powerful and your skin needs time to get used to them. Use them all together and the red, flaky mess is guaranteed.

Don’t get me wrong. Depending on how resistant your skin is, overtime you may be able to use two or three of them together.

But when you’re starting out, it’s best to let retinoids play solo. Remove all the other powerful actives from your skincare routine and reintroduce them once your skin has gotten used to the retinoid.

My skin is used to high concentration of retinol but I still alternate it with glycolic acid at night. I could use them together but I believe in treating my skin gently. In the morning, I use vitamin C. This way, I can fit all the good stuff into my skincare routine without bothering my skin.

P.S. While we’re on the subject, don’t use exfoliating scrubs, Clarisonic or anything else that could irritate your skin. The simpler and shorter your skincare routine is in the earlier stages, the better.

The Bottom Line

You can jump on the retinoid train or up your dose without putting up with flaky skin. The trick is to adjust your skincare routine accordingly. Go basic, moisturise the heck out of your skin and go slow. This is a marathon, not a race.

How do you counteract the peeling effects of retinoids?

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10 comments

Alicia April 2, 2018 - 1:49 pm

Is there a printer version of this for me to print out & keep for reference please ? I am using Tretinoin as prescribed

Reply
Gio April 8, 2018 - 4:59 pm

Alicia, unfortunately I don’t have a print version but you can copy and paste it on Word and print it out.

Reply
jeff thompson April 3, 2018 - 3:46 am

is retinol stable in a serum that contains water? and the bottles with a dropper bottle seems crazy to me, all the air getting inside

Reply
Gio April 8, 2018 - 11:32 am

Jeff, it depends on the type of retinol used. If it’s micro encapsulated, it’s well protected. Otherwise, it’s best to look for a more stable packaging or close that bottle really quickly!

Reply
Minn April 4, 2018 - 12:15 am

Gio, maybe you could help me thinking. So, as you say, retinoids make more dead cells on skin surface. Now let’s say, I have keratinization disorder which leads to acne (among other reasons of course and theoretical because not diagnosed) – which would mean, my dead cells clogg up.
I do not intend to say retinoids would make acne worse in this case. I’m thinking then (acid) peelings would be (maybe even more) important to get rid of the dead cells. Because retinoids do not exfoliate, right? Or am I missing something here?

Reply
Gio April 8, 2018 - 11:31 am

Minn, no retinoids don’t exfoliate. Adding salicylic acid to exfoliate skin would help get rid of the excess of dead cells and help you keep your pores clean.

Reply
Anne Berry January 10, 2019 - 4:37 am

When using my retinoid at night, should the routine really just be Cleanse, Retinoid, Moisturize? Anything like a BHA, Azelaic acid should be left for another night?

Reply
Gio January 12, 2019 - 6:13 pm

Anne, you can use a hyaluronic acid serum or other basic product like that with retinol. But yes, it’s best to live active ingredients (vitamin C, acids etc) for another night.

Reply
Lee August 14, 2019 - 9:00 am

Hi Gio. So you have recommended The Ordinary Granactive Retinoid 2% In Squalane. What is Granactive Retinoid vs Retinol and which is stronger? I have just about finished The Ordinary Retinol 0.2% in Squalane and am not sure it has done anything (although I do quite like the feel of the Squalane on my skin, even though I have oily skin it doesn’t seem to male it oily!). Was going to purchase the Retinol 0.5% in Squalane next to try but would you recommend the Granactive Retinoid instead?

Reply
Gio September 14, 2019 - 12:41 pm

Lee, I recommend different things to different skin types. Granactive retinoid is for sensitive skin. If your skin can tolerate 0.2% retinol, the next step up is 0.5% retinol.

Reply

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