the best and worst dr Sebagh products

When Dr Sebagh started his career as a facial plastic surgeon 30 years ago, all he could do was give his patients a face lift. There were no fillers. No cosmeceuticals actives – like Vitamin C – in skincare products. Heck, people didn’t even use sunscreen.

Since then, things have changed (thank goodness!). We now have lasers, fillers, OTC retinoids and all kinds of new ingredients and technology that can help us age better – if not reverse the clock yet. 🙁

Dr Sebagh didn’t hesitate to offer all these new breakthrough treatments in his clinics. Sadly, the same can’t be said for his skincare line.

As I was going through the products for this roundup, I was disappointed to see how basic his line is. They’re all super moisturising but the lack of antioxidants is staggering. Even the best products have barely one active. The rest of the formulas is just moisturisers or fillers.

Where are all the antioxidants? Why not include 3 or 4 peptides instead than just one? What happened to all the new innovative ingredients that have been discovered in the past 30 years?

If the products were cheap, I wouldn’t mind (much). You have to cut corners somewhere. But charging premium prices for basic skincare ins’t cool, Dr Sebagh.

Still, some of your products are just about worth it – if money isn’t a concern for you. I couldn’t review them all but here are my top good and bad picks. I hope they’ll give you an idea of what to expect from this line, what to splurge on and what to avoid:

Still, some of your products are just about worth it – if money isn’t a concern for you. I couldn’t review them all but here are my top good and bad picks. I hope they’ll give you an idea of what to expect from this line, what to splurge on and what to avoid:

Good: Dr Sebagh Deep Exfoliating Mask ($95.00)

Dr Sebagh Deep Exfoliating Mask is loaded with lactic acid, the gentlest member of the AHAs family. AHAs are exfoliants: they dissolve the “glue” that holds skin cells together. When you get rid of the superficial damaged cells, your skin looks smoother. Wrinkles looks smaller. Your whole face is brighter. The best part? Lactic acid is gentle enough even for sensitive skin! One more thing: lactic acid hydrates skin, too.

Available at: Net-A-Porter and SpaceNK

Related: Glycolic Acid Vs Lactic Acid: Which One Should You Use?


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Bad: Dr Sebagh Instant V Lift ($225.00)

Dubbed ‘Hollywood’s lifting tape’, Dr Sebagh Instant V Lift promises to tighten and firm skin immediately. And it delivers. Ugh?! So why it’s in the bad category? Pullulan. Pullulan is a film former: it adheres well to the skin, creating a film that gives your skin a tight feel and look. The catch? The results are only temporary. Wash it off and your skin is as saggy as it was before. If you want to use it for a special occasion and your wallet can take the hit, go for it. But for £150 I want long-term results. Don’t you?

Related: Treatment VS Prevention: What Really Works Against Wrinkles

Good: Dr Sebagh Pure Vitamin C Powder Cream (5×1.95g, $105.00)

Dr Sebagh Pure Vitamin C Powder Cream is a little misleading. The name suggests it uses L-Ascorbic Acid, the pure form of Vitamin C. Instead, this cheeky little thing uses Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate, a derivative. That’s good. It means it’s gentler even for sensitive skin, but still effective. It boosts collagen production, brightens skin and even helps treat acne! The catch? Vitamin C is way more effective when used with Vitamin E and ferulic acid. Sadly, neither is here. This is a very basic serum, especially considered the price. But if you don’t mind supplementing, this works.

Available at: Net-A-Porter and SpaceNK

Related: Types Of Vitamin C Used In Skincare

Bad: High Maintenance Cream ($150.00)

If you call yourself High Maintenance Cream, I’m gonna have huge expectations from you. I’ll want you to smoothen out my skin, reduce my wrinkles and make my skin glow. And if you cost $150.00, you should also get rid of my dark spots and make me tea. Instead, all this cream does is moisturise skin. It uses a mix of silicones to trap water in and fill in wrinkles, so they look smaller for a while; a bunch of synthetic emollients with a sprinkle of natural oils to make skin soft and smooth; and the odd humectants to hydrate skin. That’s it. You don’t need to spend $150 on it. Any moisturiser out there will do the trick – without asking you for a kidney in return!

Goodish: Serum Repair ($105.00)

I struggled to decide where to place Dr Sebagh Serum Repair ($105.00). On the one hand, it’s a solid hyaluronic acid serum. Hyaluronic acid is a moisture magnet that attracts and binds to your skin up to 1000 times its weight in water. All that moisture softens your skin, plumps it up so your wrinkles look smaller, and makes it glow. On the other, that’s pretty much all it does. There’s nothing here that can repair anything. Sure, Dr Sebagh has put a big dollop of collagen here. But putting collagen on your skin doesn’t boost the production of your collagen (if only it were that easy!). But it does moisturise skin. So if your skin needs an extra bout of moisture and you’re not bothered by the price tag, you’ll like this. But if you were hoping it would repair damage, sorry, no can do.

Available at: Net-A-Porter and SpaceNK

Related: The Best Hyaluronic Acid Serums